Kids: Want Ads here! #HouseofAnansi

Kids: Want Ads here! #HouseofAnansi

Reference material and first stocking stuffer. #alwaysworking #alwaysbacon #whogetsthestuffer #typebooks

Reference material and first stocking stuffer. #alwaysworking #alwaysbacon #whogetsthestuffer #typebooks

Baby studies

Baby studies

#baby

#baby

explore-blog:

New study looks at what children’s drawings at age 4 reveal about their future thinking skills:

Researchers from King’s College London enlisted 7,700 pairs of 4-year-old identical and fraternal twins in England to draw pictures of a child. The researchers scored each drawing on a scale of 0 to 12, based on how many body parts were included. All the kids also took verbal and nonverbal intelligence tests at 4 and 14.
Kids with higher drawing scores tended to do better on the intelligence tests, though the two were only moderately linked.

Of course, one major limitation is that the study seems to conflate accuracy with intelligence, an approach that reflects our culture’s persistently narrow definition of intelligence and a failure to account for all the other realms of ability in Howard Gardner’s pioneering Theory of Multiple Intelligences. Perhaps kids who are less accurate but display a higher degree of abstract thought would end up more gifted in fields rely on symbolism and metaphorical thinking, from writing to painting. 
Granted, the researchers seem to be aware of this shortcoming. NPR reports:

[The researchers] are trying to figure out whether judging the children’s art in some other way (maybe based on creativity instead of accuracy) would reveal something different about their intelligence.

explore-blog:

New study looks at what children’s drawings at age 4 reveal about their future thinking skills:

Researchers from King’s College London enlisted 7,700 pairs of 4-year-old identical and fraternal twins in England to draw pictures of a child. The researchers scored each drawing on a scale of 0 to 12, based on how many body parts were included. All the kids also took verbal and nonverbal intelligence tests at 4 and 14.

Kids with higher drawing scores tended to do better on the intelligence tests, though the two were only moderately linked.

Of course, one major limitation is that the study seems to conflate accuracy with intelligence, an approach that reflects our culture’s persistently narrow definition of intelligence and a failure to account for all the other realms of ability in Howard Gardner’s pioneering Theory of Multiple Intelligences. Perhaps kids who are less accurate but display a higher degree of abstract thought would end up more gifted in fields rely on symbolism and metaphorical thinking, from writing to painting. 

Granted, the researchers seem to be aware of this shortcoming. NPR reports:

[The researchers] are trying to figure out whether judging the children’s art in some other way (maybe based on creativity instead of accuracy) would reveal something different about their intelligence.

#WhitePine needle tea, high in C & A.

#WhitePine needle tea, high in C & A.

A Downey Woodpecker dins here.l

A Downey Woodpecker dins here.l

More summer best reads.  #creativity + #business #management #introspection from Pixar ‘s Ed Catmull

More summer best reads. #creativity + #business #management #introspection from Pixar ‘s Ed Catmull

littletechie14:

I want to swing on this swing

littletechie14:

I want to swing on this swing

(Source: Y-O-Y-O, via cindylikesgifs)

There is some serious Comedia Dell’Arte going on here. #canoetipsneeded #whichwayforward #whatisajstroke #helpus

There is some serious Comedia Dell’Arte going on here. #canoetipsneeded #whichwayforward #whatisajstroke #helpus